Tag Archives: stem cell hair

RepliCel Now Accepting Applications for Upcoming Clinical Trials of Hair Cloning Technology

RepliCel™ Life Sciences, based in Vancouver, British Columbia, is currently accepting the names of people interested in maybe participating in the next round of its clinical trials of its new hair cloning treatment. Its current Phase I/IIa clinical trials, being conducted in Georgia, are scheduled to end in April 2012.

Replical’s hair regeneration technology involves the harvesting and multiplication of what are called dermal sheath cup (DSC) cells located in a “bulb” at the base of the hair follicle.

In laboratory studies, RepliCel™ scientists have found that DSC cells both stimulate the development of mature hair follicles and the creation of new ones. The scientists discovered that the DSC cells are capable of actually regrowing the dermal papilla and hair follicles themselves.

The way the treatment works is this. Trained technicians harvest DSC cells at locations in the base of the neck, where they are plentiful. These harvested DSC cells are then placed in a special nutrient medium in a laboratory where they multiply.

Once there are a sufficient number of DSC cells taken from a patient’s own neck hairs, the new cells are injected directly into the scalp where hair loss has occurred. Like reseeding a lawn, the DSC cells “migrate” to hair papilla that already exist and effect an regenerative transformation. They also create brand-new hair follicles.

Most importantly, the harvested DSC cells are taken from hair follicles, at the base of the head near the neck, that are not as sensitive to male sex hormones (androgens) which, scientists believe, are what cause the hair follicle miniaturization that makes hair loss happen in the first place.

Also, because the DSC cells come from the patient’s own body, rejection of the cells is far less likely.

RepliCel™ is now accepting queries from individuals who might be interested in participating in its new round of clinical trials. If you’d like more information about possibly participating in its new Phase I/IIa clinical trial of its hair regeneration technology, fill in the form below:

Recoverup’s Stem Cell Treatment for Hair Loss

Recoverup is a company that is now offering a stem cell treatment for hair loss that involves the harvesting of a patient’s own (autologous) stem cells, taken from body fat, and then injected them into the scalp to stimulate hair growth. Registered in the UK and a subsidiary of Rejuvenation & Regeneration Healthcare (R&R), Recoverup apparently operates a clinic in Taiwan and perhaps at other locations around the world. The company doesn’t disclose the locations of its facilities and would-be users of its services must fill out a contact form and get information that way.

The details of Recoverup’s treatment protocol are fairly clear. It involves a two-step procedure. First, the patient’s stem cells are extracted from a patient’s own adipose tissue (fat) with a liposuction-like procedure and using a local anesthetic. Approxinmately 200 ml of fat cells are removed. After that, the stem cells are then separated out using a centrifuge and alleged cultured in media until a certain concentration is met — although the “treatment” is minimal and is performed in a single day. The second phase of the treatment involves the “application” of the isolated stem cells to the scalp. The stem cells are injected into the scalp using a micro needle. The removal of the fat cells and the re-application can be done in a single day, the company says.

The cost is between USD $8,000 and $13,000.

Recoverup claims that patients see results in just two weeks. It adds that 40% of treatment areas will see either darker, thicker or faster growing hair or more hair per follicle.

We asked one of our regular writers, D.A. Leatherman, to comment on this treatment. Full disclosure: Dr. Leatherman is the CEO of Cygenx which markets a stem cell-based topical hair serum based on growth factors. We receive commissions on sales of Dr. Leatherman’s products.

“I had this exact procedure performed on my scalp three years ago with no visible improvement in hair growth. I had injected into my scalp adult autologous adipose derived stem cells with other regenerative cells (referred to as stem cell soup) that were collected from my own stem cell pellet known as the stromal vascular fraction (SVF). No hair developed, not even vellus hair.

“Although I do not know the cost of this treatment, it is a medical procedure and therefore undoubtedly expensive. Furthermore, it has no real science to lend support for any need of adding stem cells via injection into the scalp.

“The reason why I am skeptical of this treatment is because we now know that lack of stem cells is NOT the reason why people lose their hair. The University of Pennsylvania has published documented scientific data that a balding persons scalp has adequate stem cells in the scalp. So one must question, why implant more stem cells derived from your own fat?

“It is not stem cells, but progenitor cells, that are deficient in the balding scalp.

“The University of Pennsylvania did identify that what was needed to actually grow hair was to ‘wake up’ the dormant stem cells. So even if stem cells are injected subcutaneously under the scalp, how do you ‘wake up’ these stem cells? They will still need to differentiate into the hair ‘organ’ of a hair follicle, that includes, glands (both sweat and oil), muscle, nerve, hair bulb, hair shaft, and several different types of skin tissues.

“Remember, this procedure calls for the injection of stem cells, not the implantation of actual hair follicles. The growth of hair requires the actual transitioning growth from the stem cell into the entire hair organ not just a simple single cell tissue type. Regenerative medicine may have added value in the future when we can grow actual hair follicles from our own scalp in vitro (no DNA rejection) and can successf ully transplant those in vitro grown follicles into our scalp. To date, this ability alludes regenerative researchers.

“Now, let us pose the most important and essential question to shed light on identifying a real remedy for hair loss: How can we wake up the stem cells that are already in the balding scalp? Answer: growth factors, cytokines and interleukins. These signaling and communicating molecules are the normal constituents found within the body that direct the differentiation of cells and signal their associated stem cells to transform into progenitor cells with the needed receptors to form muscle, glands, hair bulbs, hair follicles and eventually hair shafts. Does this sound like a fast process? I assure you, it is not. However, science and positive outcomes are validating every day that this is the answer to correcting hair loss conditions. The sooner the candidate identifies a hair loss condition and commences use of these growth factors, the better and faster the results. The longer the condition has been present the longer it takes to reverse it.”

If you would like more information about Cygenx or wish to contact Dr. Leatherman, click here.

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Does Acell Matristem & PRP Result in Genuine Hair Regeneration?

A number of hair restoration surgeons are now claiming that they can effect genuine hair regeneration from dormant follicles through the combination of two medical therapies: So-called PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) Injections and a product called ACell MatriStem. Acell MatriStem is “porcine urinary bladder matrix,” derived from pig bladder cells, that has proven to be very helpful in wound healing. And as readers of this website know, wound healing has been at the forefront of research into hair cloning and hair follicle regeneration.

At the 19th annual conference last year of the International Society of Hair Transplant Surgeons held in Anchorage, Alaska, Dr. Gary Hitzig presented evidence that Acell “attacts” adult stem cells to a “wound” and converts them into the progenitor cells that, in the case of hair follicles, actually grow hair. So, the idea is to combined Acell with large amounts of adult stem cells taken from the patient’s own body — which is where the Platelet Rich Plasma comes in — and then to inject this concoction into the bald areas of the scalp. The hope is that it will send signals to the adult stem cells lurking in the dormant hair follicles and, in essence, wake them up.
A number of clinics worldwide are now performing this procedure — apparently with some success. The pictures I’ve seen definitely show renewed hair growth but it’s not a panacea. It’s still a messy, bloody business that looks a lot like hair transplant surgery, but many people are more than willing to undergo it.

What is interesting is the proposed mechanism for how this works. In essence, the Acell and PRP combination floods the scalp area with growth factors that play a crucial role in jump-starting these comatose hair follicle stem cells.

This is a lot like what Histogen is proposing with its Hair Stimulating COmplex (HSC) and what Cygenx claims is the basis of its RegenRXx stem cell hair serum. A lot of different research strands are coming togehter, in other words, that point to growth factors as *the* key in basically curing baldness and coming up with a realistic stem cell hair growth treatment.

If this works… and it can be combined with a genuine hair cloning technology like that of RepliCel or Aderans, then we truly might see a realistic baldness cure — and sooner rather than later.

Similar Posts:

Does Acell Matristem & PRP Result in Genuine Hair Regeneration?

A number of hair restoration surgeons are now claiming that they can effect genuine hair regeneration from dormant follicles through the combination of two medical therapies: So-called PRP (Platelet Rich Plasma) Injections and a product called ACell MatriStem. Acell MatriStem is “porcine urinary bladder matrix,” derived from pig bladder cells, that has proven to be very helpful in wound healing. And as readers of this website know, wound healing has been at the forefront of research into hair cloning and hair follicle regeneration.

At the 19th annual conference last year of the International Society of Hair Transplant Surgeons held in Anchorage, Alaska, Dr. Gary Hitzig presented evidence that Acell “attacts” adult stem cells to a “wound” and converts them into the progenitor cells that, in the case of hair follicles, actually grow hair. So, the idea is to combined Acell with large amounts of adult stem cells taken from the patient’s own body — which is where the Platelet Rich Plasma comes in — and then to inject this concoction into the bald areas of the scalp. The hope is that it will send signals to the adult stem cells lurking in the dormant hair follicles and, in essence, wake them up.

A number of clinics worldwide are now performing this procedure — apparently with some success. The pictures I’ve seen definitely show renewed hair growth but it’s not a panacea. It’s still a messy, bloody business that looks a lot like hair transplant surgery, but many people are more than willing to undergo it.

What is interesting is the proposed mechanism for how this works. In essence, the Acell and PRP combination floods the scalp area with growth factors that play a crucial role in jump-starting these comatose hair follicle stem cells.

This is a lot like what Histogen is proposing with its Hair Stimulating COmplex (HSC) and what Cygenx claims is the basis of its RegenRXx stem cell hair serum. A lot of different research strands are coming togehter, in other words, that point to growth factors as *the* key in basically curing baldness and coming up with a realistic stem cell hair growth treatment.

If this works… and it can be combined with a genuine hair cloning technology like that of RepliCel or Aderans, then we truly might see a realistic baldness cure — and sooner rather than later.

Similar Posts:

RepliCel Now Accepting Applications for Upcoming Clinical Trials of Hair Cloning Technology

RepliCel™ Life Sciences, based in Vancouver, British Columbia, is currently accepting the names of people interested in maybe participating in the next round of its clinical trials of its new hair cloning treatment. Its current Phase I/IIa clinical trials, being conducted in Georgia, are scheduled to end in April 2012.

Replical’s hair regeneration technology involves the harvesting and multiplication of what are called dermal sheath cup (DSC) cells located in a “bulb” at the base of the hair follicle.

In laboratory studies, RepliCel™ scientists have found that DSC cells both stimulate the development of mature hair follicles and the creation of new ones. The scientists discovered that the DSC cells are capable of actually regrowing the dermal papilla and hair follicles themselves.

The way the treatment works is this. Trained technicians harvest DSC cells at locations in the base of the neck, where they are plentiful. These harvested DSC cells are then placed in a special nutrient medium in a laboratory where they multiply.

Once there are a sufficient number of DSC cells taken from a patient’s own neck hairs, the new cells are injected directly into the scalp where hair loss has occurred. Like reseeding a lawn, the DSC cells “migrate” to hair papilla that already exist and effect an regenerative transformation. They also create brand-new hair follicles.

Most importantly, the harvested DSC cells are taken from hair follicles, at the base of the head near the neck, that are not as sensitive to male sex hormones (androgens) which, scientists believe, are what cause the hair follicle miniaturization that makes hair loss happen in the first place.

Also, because the DSC cells come from the patient’s own body, rejection of the cells is far less likely.

RepliCel™ is now accepting queries from individuals who might be interested in participating in its new round of clinical trials.

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Aderans Research and Clinical Trials in Stem Cell Hair Loss Treatments

Aderans Research [ARI] is a subsidiary of two companies interested in developing innovative new stem cell treatments for hair loss resulting from a number of differing causes –  including genetic male and female pattern baldness, medical treatments for cancer, and injuries resulting in damage to hair follicles such as burns or wounds. Aderans Research is located in Atlanta, Ga. The parent company, Aderans Co., Ltd, is located in Beverly Hills working in conjunction with Bosley hair treatment and clinics.

ARI is in the second phase of developing cellular restoration products for hair regrowth applications. In November 2011, Aderans announced that it was opening new facilities for additional clinical trials in association with Radiant Research in four new cities across the nation. Some clinics are still accepting people who wish to participate in the study. To date, over 356 individuals have been joined the study as clinical subjects.

Aderans Research’s signature treatment involves using a subject’s own hair stem cells, thus eliminating concerns about rejection. By cultivating stem cells from the subject himself or herself, other complications – such as infections or disease transmission — are dramatically reduced. ARI studies regeneration of hair cells at the follicular level for both men and women.

A stem cell is any cell from any part of the body – skin, brain, fatty tissue, hair, or organs – which has the ability to replicate itself. This process is much like the stem of a plant which sprouts leaves along its length. These cells are one part of the ingredient in hair regeneration. The second part is the cell that acts an “alarm clock” for waking dormant cells.

It has been known since the University of Pennsylvania’s study in 2004 that hair follicles include multiple cells. Some of these cells are hair replication cells, which control the cyclical growth of hair. Other cells are communicator cells, which are necessary to wake the dormant cells when it is time for them to grow. People with certain types of hair loss are now known to lack the alarm clock cells (also known as progenitor cells). Unless there is a method to inform the dormant cells that it is time to activate, hairs are not generated.

In a Yale University research program in November 2011, it was discovered that the communication cells, which instruct the hair cells to grow, are found in the fatty layer below the epidermis. The full ramifications of this discovery are still not clear but hopes remain strong that this will lead to the ability to replicate other cells in the human body. Until this time, the value of the fatty layer was not understood.

With the latest breakthroughs in molecular endocrinology regarding communicator cells in the fatty layer beneath the skin and with the Yale research demonstrating the importance of fat cells for hair growth, Aderans has developed products that taking advantage of these new breakthorughs. However, this does not address issues with an underlying cause related to the contraction of hair follicles.

One of the major problems that hair restoration doctors face is the patchy effect of surgical transplants. The question of why one area of the scalp would allow hair regrowth while another in close proximity would not could not be explained. The Yale and University of Penn studies shed light on this problem. With that, researchers around the world have been working to develop methods to overcome the problem.

During Phase I of Aderans’s clinical studies, conducted in the U.K., Aderans focused on pattern redistribution issues noted in traditional surgical transplants and medical treatments for regrowth. One of the problems documented was the limitation of distribution of hair regrowth in surgical transplants.

The process used by Aderans involves the reproduction or replication of hair cells taken from a subject. By removing hair samples from the subjects scalp, the stem cells from the follicle are stripped out and placed in a medium that incubates the cells. The medium contains nutrients that are necessary for the cells to replicate on their own. In this way, there are an unlimited number of hair follicles to replant in the subjects scalp. In addition, the fat cells that are a necessary part of the continuation of hair growth develop simultaneously during replication due to the medium used.

Part of the medium used by Aderans is a small amount of tissue removed from the nape of the subject’s neck. By using this method, the fat cells become an integral part of the cloning process and compatible with the subject. This tissue — used with Wnt proteins — stimulates the replication system of the cells in a natural way.

In January 2012, Dr. Ken Washenik participated as a presenter for the 2012 Winter Dermatology Conference in Maui. Speaking on “Emerging Therapies for Hair Loss,” Dr. Washenik discussed the treatments and new breakthroughs of molecular dermatology as well as the latest advances in Aderans’ Ji Gami product line. He stressed the advance in products still in the pipeline that are proving to be consistently stable.

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Stem Cell for Hair Loss: Dr. Coen Gho Pioneers Patented Hair Follicle Multiplication and Hair Growth Technologies

Dutch researcher and hair restoration expert Dr. Coen Gho has been publicizing an innovative experimental treatment for hair loss for many years through his Hair Science Institute, which operates clinics in Amsterdam, Maastricht, London and Vienna. His hair loss treatment, he says, is a patented hair multiplication technique developed by the Hair Science Institute and used exclusively in its clinics. It involves the transplantation of a new hair substitute created from the genetic material of existing human hair. According to Dr. Gho’s website “only a part of the follicle (a few hair stem cells, also called a ‘graft’)” are extracted from donor sites and used in the process. More traditional methods of hair transplant involve extraction of entire hair follicles. The follicles are removed or harvested and then relocated to the balding area, where those follicles can be stimulated to produce new growth of hair. According to Dr. Gho, because his procedure uses on a portion of an existing hair follicle, and not the entire hair follicle itself, his procedure has the advantage of being able to transplant more hairs than could be accomplished when those hairs and follicles must be removed from another site on the body.

As a result, Dr. Gho claims to manufacture hundreds of new hair substitutes for use in a type of hair transplant operation using a single existing hair, thus eliminating the need to harvest hairs from donor sites. The availability of more hair substitutes with which to transplant may, in turn, make the hair transplant procedure itself more available to more clients. Many men facing male pattern baldness are waiting anxiously for the release of the approved new process, although some hitches in technical research have delayed the release and availability of this newest procedure.

Dr. Gho’s treatment for hair has been criticized by some in the hair transplant community — for example, by Dr. William Rassman.

Thus Dr. Gho’s currently available procedure, referred to as Hair Stem cell Transplant, or HST, combines elements of hair transplant and hair multiplication. The limitations of HST, according to Dr. Gho, have to do with the number of follicles (approximately six hundred) that can be trans-located during a single procedure. With such a small number per procedure, the restoration of an entire bald scalp would take a great deal of time and expense. Having said that, the procedure’s supposed advantages include the fact that HST results in the least scarring or surgical soreness of any method available, and the assertion by Dr. Gho that nearly four fifths of the donated hairs regrow and can be reharvested for later procedures. If nothing else, Dr. Gho’s advancements offer hope in the arena of hair replacement, with the knowledge that new approaches and new technologies are being tested and tried with some success.

More traditional hair transplants are limited in scope by the limitations of donor sites; Dr. Gho’s innovative approach promises to circumvent that limitation, opening new possibilities for sufferers of male pattern baldness.

Unlike neogenesis, a process which creates entirely new hair follicles in the scalp, Dr. Gho’s procedure may have the potential to stimulate the shedding follicles to regenerate and reinvigorate the growth of natural hairs.

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